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Perhaps A Fragment Is All We Have: On Stephanie Acosta’s “Good Day God Damn”

Some days, I find myself so lost in my own thoughts that I completely forget where I lock my bike. I walk around in circles, block after block, examining every bike rack and street post trying to find my own. Sometimes, I walk right past it, after a cursory glance has me convinced it’s just a look-a-like, and only a second look forces me to recognize it as my bike. In these moments, I am walking outside but I am clearly elsewhere. I am questioning my choices, my relationships, my values, and asking myself: why exactly are you alive? Some of the most compelling artwork encourages us to reflect on this interiority and the underlying thoughts we hold. Transgressive, unpopular, unwelcome, unmoored––we suppress until we have the emotional capacity to process these thoughts. Making sense of it all can be difficult, and sharing this confusion even more so, as we expose ourselves to the risks of the unknown. I am reminded of these thoughts as I walk through Stephanie Acosta’s immersive exhibition Good Day God Damn at the Chocolate Factory.
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A Celebratory and Scrappy Farewell (and Hello) in Queens

Street performances celebrated the Chocolate Factory Theater, a space that has often seemed inseparable from the work that happens there, as it moved to a new building.
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Goodbye To The “Old” CF Outdoor Quasi-Mini-“Festival”

To celebrate the closing of our 49th Avenue space - home to The Chocolate Factory Theater since 2004 - we hosted an outdoor mini-"festival" as part of the NYC Open Culture Program.
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Melanie Maar

At the future Chocolate Factory Theater, 38-29 24th Street (corner of 39th Avenue), LIC. We're launching a book and a new short film as part of Line Death Dance! This multi year performance project by Melanie Maar, conceived to accompany The Chocolate Factory Theater's space transformations, was transformed itself by the pandemic and by a loss for the "live".
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One Door Closes, Another Opens

Please join us to celebrate the closing of our 15+ year home and the launch of our new permanent facility with a special toast / gathering / remembrance / (small) party featuring special guests (TBA) and delicious snacks & cocktails courtesy of our good friends (and soon-to-be-former-neighbors!) Casa Enrique.
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Private Viewings

On June 30, 2021 The Chocolate Factory's 15+ year home on 49th Avenue will close its doors for good. To honor this momentous occasion, we are pleased to offer a limited number of private viewing appointments. Spend a few minutes alone in our dead, empty space. Laugh, cry, dance, get drunk, whatever moves you! Appointments are FREE (though donations will be accepted), first come first served.
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Stephanie Acosta

At the future Chocolate Factory Theater, 38-29 24th Street (corner of 39th Avenue), LIC. Originally scheduled to premiere as an ensemble performance at The Chocolate Factory in March 2020, Good Day God Damn returns as a durational installation which considers multi-crisis chaos, the mundane nature of the apocalypse, and the simultaneous impossibility, myth, and violence of the american landscape - transmuting an unseen performance through the emotional landscape of 2020 in order to create a new work infused with the archive of its past experiments.
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Apocalypse Talks

Introducing Apocalypse Talks. Join us weekly on Wednesdays at 7pm as we get into the textures, sensations, emotions, landscapes, materials, aromas, by-products, aesthetics, and other messiness of living in a multi-crisis reality. With a range of guests we’ll talk about how we are dealing, and how our practices and processes refract life in the end times.
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Kristen Kosmas

attend the opening is a new mail art project by Seattle-based writer, performer, and interdisciplinary artist Kristen Kosmas. On the Boards (WA) and The Chocolate Factory Theater (NY) have co-commissioned Kosmas to expand her ongoing mail art project, attend the opening, in which she mails handmade collage works, unprompted, to her extended community. These works form a tactile accumulation of personal connections and a record of the shifting narrative of the global pandemic.
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Millie Kapp + Matt Shalzi