Archive

Since its first season in 2005, The Chocolate Factory Theater has supported the development and presentation of new work by a community of local, national and international artists working in dance, theater, and interdisciplinary performance. The Chocolate Factory’s programs have drawn many thousands of new visitors to its 5,000 square foot industrial facility in Long Island City, Queens. The organization recently purchased a permanent facility in the neighborhood.

Archived Events

My performance practice commits to formalism as a tool for structural reclamation utilized as an organizing system and ideology to observe and hold space for wild and other’d bodies. Pattern making becomes a survival skill to locate self, others and situation within chaotic systems. Mathematical and mapped scores support bodies bleeding human truths, opening peep holes and revelations for collective performers and audiences. I source from the in-between spaces of my mixed-race body, my slippery transgender body, the in-between planes of ritual spiritual practice, and the in-between transitions of death and dying, witnessed in my practice as a new nurse.
For a long time, the choreographer Stina Nyberg has been walking in the footsteps of the inventor Nikola Tesla; gathering stories, technologies and myths about the vibrant history of the wireless. In The Woman Who Lit The World she tells the story of how she came to visit Tesla’s private library in Belgrade, have her photo taken in Tesla’s room at the Hotel New Yorker, get a hug from the boss of the Tesla Science Center on Long Island, tried to break in into the remaining building of the legendary Adam’s Power Plant in Niagara Falls, failed to build a tiny tesla coil at the maker space Fat Cat Fat Lab in Greenwich Village, danced with a Tesla coil in the barn of a Danish foot therapist, mastered the art of the remote control and finally stopped doubting the magic of electricity. Step by step, she realizes how the story of the genius turns into a story about herself.
(Photo © Brian Rogers) In the year preceding this performance, Lauren Bakst has been looking at her life as an object of study. This practice has inevitably transformed her life into a kind of fiction or theater, and it is this theater from which More Problems with Form emerges. Studying her own performances inside of pre-existing forms, in which she has at times played the roles of wife, woman, dancer, audience member, analysand, and many others, Lauren asks: when does performing, in life and on stage, make space for the unwieldy contradictions of living and desiring, and when does it hold things, like bodies, people, and ideologies, in place?
Upcoming screening: Baryshnikov Arts Center, February 7 2019. Screamers is a 75-minute feature film created and performed by members of the experimental dance, theater and performance communities – including dancers, choreographers, directors and performing arts curators. A kind of conceptual ghost story, Screamers was conceived during a year-long residency at a former Catholic Church owned by the artist Dan Hurlin in Stuyvesant, NY – and was subsequently filmed over the course of two weeks in September 2015, with additional filming in the Playhouse at Abrons Arts Center.
The first phase of a multi-year creative exchange (supported by the Australia Council) with Melbourne-based artist Phillip Adams and his recently launched venue Temperance Hall, supporting new collaborations between Australia and NYC-based artists. This process will culminate in a NY premiere at The Chocolate Factory in 2020.